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    preparing for the annual conference of the Syria Ophthalmological Society
    Beginning to prepare for the 38th annual conference of the Syria Ophthalmological Society with Arab and Foreigners in Damascus - Ebla al sham Hotel (9 -10 - 11 ) April 2020
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    Guests speakers participating in the 38th annual conference of the association
    The association's annual conference is prepared jointly with Guests speakers from all over the world
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    Scientific symposium on glaucoma
    Under the patronage of the Military Medical Services Administration, Tishreen Military Hospital , in cooperation with the Syrian Association of Ophthalmologists , has the honor to invite you to attend to scientific symposium on glaucoma at the grand hall at tishreen Military Hospital at 8:30 am on Saurday, February 29,2020 Lecturers : Dr. Ali Shekha - Dr. Nuha Fayyoumi - Dr. salah mugharbel - Dr. Bassel faaouri - Dr. Hussein Zeinab Open invitation
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    The scientific program of the Mashta El Helou symposium
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    Mashta al-Helou Eye Forum
    The Syrian Ophthalmological Society holds a scientific symposium, and the lectures will be transmitted over the Internet On (16-17) July 2020 In Mashta Al-Helo resort -Tartous - Syria
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    Mashta Al-Helou Eye Forum
    The Syrian Ophthalmological Society , in cooperation with the private Valley University, conducted a scientific symposium "Mashta Al Helou Eye Forum" On (17-16) September 2020 And a group of doctors from outside and inside the country participated in the meeting
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    Corona virus may be transmitted through the eyes
    Corona virus may be transmitted through the eyes ... and a warning of the "dangerousness" of tears A recent study warned that the Corona virus can enter the body through the eye, indicating that tears contaminated with the virus may be a source of transmission. The results of the study, conducted by a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the United States, come after people who had been infected with the Corona virus complained of eye irritation and conjunctivitis. The Corona virus can attach to cells inside the body through "ACE receptors", and these receptors are found in the lungs and the respiratory system, but scientists have found that the eye also produces "ACE-2 receptors", making it a target for the virus. And the scientists who conducted the study revealed "the presence of the virus in tear samples of a number of people with corona," according to the British newspaper "The Sun", on Monday. They added that it is possible that the surface of the eye will serve as an entrance to the virus, if it is exposed to droplets flying in the air or by wiping the eye with a contaminated hand. The team took samples from the cornea of ​​the eyes of some Corona virus patients, and found that the virus was particularly prominent in the conjunctiva and the cornea, according to the study. The results of the study also indicated that eye swabs showed the presence of the virus in the eye for 27 days after the initial symptoms of the disease, despite the absence of the virus in the nasal swabs. The results of the study may provide additional information regarding the role of the ocular surface in the transmission of the Corona virus, as it is possible that the surface of the eye may form a reservoir for the virus. The study team highlighted other studies related to the transmission of the virus through the eyes, including those that concluded that there is no clear evidence about the possibility of virus transmission through the eyes. The research team emphasized that the results of the study they reached highlight the importance of maintaining personal hygiene during the outbreak, and continuing to follow personal protection measures.
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    The Syrian Society of Ophthalmology is participating in a conference Middle East Ophthalmology Meeting (MEOM)
    Dear colleagues...... The Syrian Society of Ophthalmology is participating in a conference Middle East Ophthalmology Meeting (MEOM) Virtual online organized by Dr. Muhammad Al-Omari From the Emirates on 16-17-18 September 2020 The duration of the session will be an hour and a half. Colleagues wishing to present valuable lectures in various specializations in kind are requested to inform us promptly of a deadline of 16 August, with the name of the lecture to be sent to the organizing committee ... The duration of the lecture is 8 minutes. Please communicate directly with a member of the Board of Directors ...
preparing for the annual conference of the Syria Ophthalmological Society
Guests speakers participating in the 38th annual conference of the association
Scientific symposium on glaucoma
The scientific program of the Mashta El Helou symposium
Mashta al-Helou Eye Forum
Mashta Al-Helou Eye Forum
Corona virus may be transmitted through the eyes
The Syrian Society of Ophthalmology is participating in a conference Middle East Ophthalmology Meeting (MEOM)
Hope for a cure for retinitis pigmentosa Hope for a cure for retinitis pigmentosa Retinitis pigmentosa is an incurable disease, but that may change thanks to a cell patch that was developed and implanted in two patients in 2019. In her report, published in the Spanish magazine Le Figaro, writer Margot Brunat said that about thirty thousand people are currently living in France with retinitis pigmentosa, a group of rare genetic diseases that lead to gradual loss of vision. This condition can begin at any age, and is most often diagnosed between 10 and 30 years old. Currently, there is no cure available for this disease, but research is developing. Crystal Monville and her team were able to develop a "cell patch" for patients with a specific form of retinitis pigmentosa. This was considered a precedent, as the researcher explained that it is "intended for patients whose mutations lead to abnormalities in the epithelial tissue cells, which represents about 5% of cases of this disease." Oyza, a 55-year-old woman with poor eyesight since birth, received her first plaster implantation on September 5, 2019. The patch is made of retinal epithelial cells made from embryonic stem cells. The researcher also explained that it "replaces the destroyed epithelium" by injection, and its content is diffused into the eye. The patch does not repair the destroyed photoreceptors, but it stops the progression of the disease, and after a month passed for Oisa, her brother - who also had this disease - was the second patient who had the transplant. And the researcher quoted that "both of them confirm that they look at the light a little better since the transplant, but they are basically able to withstand the patch, and there are no complications." The author stated that 12 patients will be included in this clinical trial. If the results are conclusive, this patch may become a treatment for some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. In this context, the researcher added that "the epithelial cells are the same cells that are damaged in macular degeneration." This opens an interesting horizon for the 1.5 million interested people.